[ANN] geocluster-facet 0.0.1

Here's a (somewhat simplistic) facet that clusters geo_points:

https://github.com/zenobase/geocluster-facet

You can see this plugin in action here:

https://zenobase.com/#/buckets/u07qih0a27/

Hoping to get some feedback, suggestions for improvements etc!

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nice plugin,thanks for sharing~

On Sat, Nov 17, 2012 at 10:20 AM, Eric Jain eric.jain@gmail.com wrote:

Here's a (somewhat simplistic) facet that clusters geo_points:

https://github.com/zenobase/geocluster-facet

You can see this plugin in action here:

https://zenobase.com/#/buckets/u07qih0a27/

Hoping to get some feedback, suggestions for improvements etc!

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Hi Eric,

this is amazing! I will play with it if it's possible to visualize the
geographic distribution of media resources that are available in libraries
for access.

Many thanks!

Jörg

On Saturday, November 17, 2012 3:20:34 AM UTC+1, Eric Jain wrote:

Here's a (somewhat simplistic) facet that clusters geo_points:

https://github.com/zenobase/geocluster-facet

You can see this plugin in action here:

https://zenobase.com/#/buckets/u07qih0a27/

Hoping to get some feedback, suggestions for improvements etc!

--

This looks great! I'm definitely going to take this for a spin, and I'll try to contribute back any fixes/changes we make.

Slightly OT: I haven't done any Java for about 8 years. Things are a little different now on the build front (maven/pom.xml etc). Do you have any pointers for someone like me to update their knowledge of modern Java development tools? (Or, put another way, what's the best place for me to learn how to wrangle a pom.xml :slight_smile: )

Thanks!

Cheers,
Dan

On 17 Nov 2012, at 02:20, Eric Jain eric.jain@gmail.com wrote:

Here's a (somewhat simplistic) facet that clusters geo_points:

https://github.com/zenobase/geocluster-facet

You can see this plugin in action here:

https://zenobase.com/#/buckets/u07qih0a27/

Hoping to get some feedback, suggestions for improvements etc!

--

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On Sat, Nov 17, 2012 at 11:10 AM, Dan Fairs dan.fairs@gmail.com wrote:

Slightly OT: I haven't done any Java for about 8 years. Things are a little
different now on the build front (maven/pom.xml etc). Do you have any
pointers for someone like me to update their knowledge of modern Java
development tools? (Or, put another way, what's the best place for me to
learn how to wrangle a pom.xml :slight_smile: )

Checking out a project and then building it with Maven from the
command line is simple enough (i.e. mvn package). Just don't attempt
to customize the build process :slight_smile:

I use Eclipse with the m2eclipse plugin [http://eclipse.org/m2e/].
This plugin can generate the .project and .classpath files for Eclipse
from the pom.xml. It also provides a graphical editor for the pom.xml
and can run builds from within Eclipse.

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Hello Eric ,

Am not sure what i should be seeing in this site -
https://zenobase.com/#/buckets/u07qih0a27/.

All i am seeing is this - http://twitpic.com/be7x7r

Kindly let me know , if i am missing anything.

Thanks
Vineeth

On Sat, Nov 17, 2012 at 7:50 AM, Eric Jain eric.jain@gmail.com wrote:

Here's a (somewhat simplistic) facet that clusters geo_points:

https://github.com/zenobase/geocluster-facet

You can see this plugin in action here:

https://zenobase.com/#/buckets/u07qih0a27/

Hoping to get some feedback, suggestions for improvements etc!

--

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Hi Dan,

some tips about Java development with ES:

  • clone the git repo of the ES plugin. If you want to maintain a branch
    with your changes to get integrated into the main development later, fork
    it. Check https://help.github.com/articles/fork-a-repo

  • ES builds use Maven right now. Maven is a project management tool with
    pros & cons, but the strength is, it can be also invoked from command line
    (without IDE) but also a lot of good IDE integrations are available, so
    developers can easily step in into the ES development by firing up their
    favorite IDE

  • the easiest method to start development with an ES plugin in my opinion
    is provided by Netbeans. Netbeans comes with embedded mvn and git
    out-of-the-box. Just download Netbeans from
    http://netbeans.org/downloads/ I prefer the "full" package because I like
    the integration of Java EE, Glassfish, Groovy, and PHP, but "Netbeans Java
    SE" is enough for ES plugins.

  • in Netbeans, select "Open Project" and select the ES plugin directory,
    then open it. Netbeans detects Maven projets automatically. That's it.
    Refer to the Netbeans menu how to build the plugin with the IDE.

Most important Maven commands are:

mvn clean -> remove all temporary build files and artifacts
mvn clean test -> build the plugin as a JAR, run tests, do not install
mvn clean install -> build the plugin as a JAR, create a ZIP artifact, and
install all artificats into your local Maven repo

You can examine the pom.xml and play with it to find out how it works.
There is a huge amount of complexity behind Maven builds, but ES builds
only exploit a few of them.

The plugin release artifact is a ZIP file in the target/releases folder.
You can take this file to install it into your ES instance. Under ES_HOME,
you can create a "plugins" folder with a plugin named subfolder (e.g.
$ES_HOME/plugins/facet-geocluster). Unpack your plugin ZIP file at this
location before starting the ES instance with ./bin/elastisearch -f. Check
the second line of the log lines for the successful loading of the plugin.
Stop ES and start ES again when updating your plugin.

These are just the basic steps to deploy a plugin, I hope this helps to get
you started.

Cheers and happy building,

Jörg

On Saturday, November 17, 2012 8:10:45 PM UTC+1, Dan Fairs wrote:

This looks great! I'm definitely going to take this for a spin, and I'll
try to contribute back any fixes/changes we make.

Slightly OT: I haven't done any Java for about 8 years. Things are a
little different now on the build front (maven/pom.xml etc). Do you have
any pointers for someone like me to update their knowledge of modern Java
development tools? (Or, put another way, what's the best place for me to
learn how to wrangle a pom.xml :slight_smile: )

Thanks!

Cheers,
Dan

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On Sat, Nov 17, 2012 at 11:42 PM, Vineeth Mohan
vineethmohan@algotree.com wrote:

Am not sure what i should be seeing in this site -
https://zenobase.com/#/buckets/u07qih0a27/.

All i am seeing is this - http://twitpic.com/be7x7r

Kindly let me know , if i am missing anything.

There was an issue with fractional timezones (such as +5:30 for India).

It's unrelated to the clustering plugin, but should be fixed now.

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Hi Jörg (and Eric),

Many thanks for your detailed responses - they're greatly appreciated!

Cheers,
Dan

On 18 Nov 2012, at 17:29, Jörg Prante joergprante@gmail.com wrote:

Hi Dan,

some tips about Java development with ES:

  • clone the git repo of the ES plugin. If you want to maintain a branch with your changes to get integrated into the main development later, fork it. Check https://help.github.com/articles/fork-a-repo

  • ES builds use Maven right now. Maven is a project management tool with pros & cons, but the strength is, it can be also invoked from command line (without IDE) but also a lot of good IDE integrations are available, so developers can easily step in into the ES development by firing up their favorite IDE

  • the easiest method to start development with an ES plugin in my opinion is provided by Netbeans. Netbeans comes with embedded mvn and git out-of-the-box. Just download Netbeans from http://netbeans.org/downloads/ I prefer the "full" package because I like the integration of Java EE, Glassfish, Groovy, and PHP, but "Netbeans Java SE" is enough for ES plugins.

  • in Netbeans, select "Open Project" and select the ES plugin directory, then open it. Netbeans detects Maven projets automatically. That's it. Refer to the Netbeans menu how to build the plugin with the IDE.

Most important Maven commands are:

mvn clean -> remove all temporary build files and artifacts
mvn clean test -> build the plugin as a JAR, run tests, do not install
mvn clean install -> build the plugin as a JAR, create a ZIP artifact, and install all artificats into your local Maven repo

You can examine the pom.xml and play with it to find out how it works. There is a huge amount of complexity behind Maven builds, but ES builds only exploit a few of them.

The plugin release artifact is a ZIP file in the target/releases folder. You can take this file to install it into your ES instance. Under ES_HOME, you can create a "plugins" folder with a plugin named subfolder (e.g. $ES_HOME/plugins/facet-geocluster). Unpack your plugin ZIP file at this location before starting the ES instance with ./bin/elastisearch -f. Check the second line of the log lines for the successful loading of the plugin. Stop ES and start ES again when updating your plugin.

These are just the basic steps to deploy a plugin, I hope this helps to get you started.

Cheers and happy building,

Jörg

On Saturday, November 17, 2012 8:10:45 PM UTC+1, Dan Fairs wrote:
This looks great! I'm definitely going to take this for a spin, and I'll try to contribute back any fixes/changes we make.

Slightly OT: I haven't done any Java for about 8 years. Things are a little different now on the build front (maven/pom.xml etc). Do you have any pointers for someone like me to update their knowledge of modern Java development tools? (Or, put another way, what's the best place for me to learn how to wrangle a pom.xml :slight_smile: )

Thanks!

Cheers,
Dan

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Dan Fairs | dan.fairs@gmail.com | @danfairs | secondsync.com

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