Elastic Search in CloudBees


(Dennis) #1

CloudBees is a nice little site. the preset up Jenkins and java environment
is great for dev and small deploys.

However, their choice of popular applications does not include
ElasticSearch. I have looked through all of the possibilties, and it still
comes up short. ES is the easiest of all search engines to use, has the
features I want out of the box, and is perfect as document/entity store.

Soooo, anyone heard of a way to deploy it on Cloudbees?

Shay, you interested in jumping on CloudBees ramp up to success? They
should end up being a decent, mid market, major share holder for Java
developers.


(Dennis) #2

A good, temporary substitute, since I'm using java HttpClient to the
localhost to get around some problems would be accessing a remote instance
via public IP.

I've looked and I must not be seeing it, if it's available.

I only need a single machine instance right now.

On Monday, June 11, 2012 7:45:24 PM UTC-7, Dennis wrote:

CloudBees is a nice little site. the preset up Jenkins and java
environment is great for dev and small deploys.

However, their choice of popular applications does not include
ElasticSearch. I have looked through all of the possibilties, and it still
comes up short. ES is the easiest of all search engines to use, has the
features I want out of the box, and is perfect as document/entity store.

Soooo, anyone heard of a way to deploy it on Cloudbees?

Shay, you interested in jumping on CloudBees ramp up to success? They
should end up being a decent, mid market, major share holder for Java
developers.


(Dennis) #3

Had another brainstorm, probably known by the more experienced ones on this
list.

Cloudbees is on EC2. If I start an EC2 instance of ElasticSearch, I will
get a private IP address. Will I be able to connect to it on
port:ESPort#/ ?

For now I'm using http transport in Java, but I'll write using the Java API
soon. I guess I just need a unique server name on my ES instance?

On Monday, June 11, 2012 8:21:32 PM UTC-7, Dennis wrote:

A good, temporary substitute, since I'm using java HttpClient to the
localhost to get around some problems would be accessing a remote instance
via public IP.

I've looked and I must not be seeing it, if it's available.

I only need a single machine instance right now.

On Monday, June 11, 2012 7:45:24 PM UTC-7, Dennis wrote:

CloudBees is a nice little site. the preset up Jenkins and java
environment is great for dev and small deploys.

However, their choice of popular applications does not include
ElasticSearch. I have looked through all of the possibilties, and it still
comes up short. ES is the easiest of all search engines to use, has the
features I want out of the box, and is perfect as document/entity store.

Soooo, anyone heard of a way to deploy it on Cloudbees?

Shay, you interested in jumping on CloudBees ramp up to success? They
should end up being a decent, mid market, major share holder for Java
developers.


(David Pilato) #4

You will get a public address to connect on.
You have only to open some ports (9300 and if needed 9200).

HTH
David :wink:
Twitter : @dadoonet / @elasticsearchfr

Le 12 juin 2012 à 07:01, Dennis gearond@gmail.com a écrit :

Had another brainstorm, probably known by the more experienced ones on this list.

Cloudbees is on EC2. If I start an EC2 instance of ElasticSearch, I will get a private IP address. Will I be able to connect to it on port:ESPort#/ ?

For now I'm using http transport in Java, but I'll write using the Java API soon. I guess I just need a unique server name on my ES instance?

On Monday, June 11, 2012 8:21:32 PM UTC-7, Dennis wrote:
A good, temporary substitute, since I'm using java HttpClient to the localhost to get around some problems would be accessing a remote instance via public IP.

I've looked and I must not be seeing it, if it's available.

I only need a single machine instance right now.

On Monday, June 11, 2012 7:45:24 PM UTC-7, Dennis wrote:
CloudBees is a nice little site. the preset up Jenkins and java environment is great for dev and small deploys.

However, their choice of popular applications does not include ElasticSearch. I have looked through all of the possibilties, and it still comes up short. ES is the easiest of all search engines to use, has the features I want out of the box, and is perfect as document/entity store.

Soooo, anyone heard of a way to deploy it on Cloudbees?

Shay, you interested in jumping on CloudBees ramp up to success? They should end up being a decent, mid market, major share holder for Java developers.


(Dennis) #5

This works using the EC2 plugin for ElasticSearch, right? Or is the machine
always CAPABLE of responding to it's network connection once the port gets
enabled? LIke my personal machine right now, if I enabled port 9300 and
9200 on it and all the firewalls in the modems/etc, the world could access
my machine's ES instance?

BTW, looks like the whole idea can be done if so. My automation
server/continuous integration server can start and stop the EC2 instance
with the server on it, and so it won't run continuously. I'm on cloudBees
to save money and use it's very helpful integrations. It just doesn't have
ES.

On Monday, June 11, 2012 10:12:28 PM UTC-7, David Pilato wrote:

You will get a public address to connect on.
You have only to open some ports (9300 and if needed 9200).

HTH
David :wink:
Twitter : @dadoonet / @elasticsearchfr

Le 12 juin 2012 à 07:01, Dennis :

Had another brainstorm, probably known by the more experienced ones on
this list.

Cloudbees is on EC2. If I start an EC2 instance of ElasticSearch, I will
get a private IP address. Will I be able to connect to it on
port:ESPort#/ ?

For now I'm using http transport in Java, but I'll write using the Java
API soon. I guess I just need a unique server name on my ES instance?

On Monday, June 11, 2012 8:21:32 PM UTC-7, Dennis wrote:

A good, temporary substitute, since I'm using java HttpClient to the
localhost to get around some problems would be accessing a remote instance
via public IP.

I've looked and I must not be seeing it, if it's available.

I only need a single machine instance right now.

On Monday, June 11, 2012 7:45:24 PM UTC-7, Dennis wrote:

CloudBees is a nice little site. the preset up Jenkins and java
environment is great for dev and small deploys.

However, their choice of popular applications does not include
ElasticSearch. I have looked through all of the possibilties, and it still
comes up short. ES is the easiest of all search engines to use, has the
features I want out of the box, and is perfect as document/entity store.

Soooo, anyone heard of a way to deploy it on Cloudbees?

Shay, you interested in jumping on CloudBees ramp up to success? They
should end up being a decent, mid market, major share holder for Java
developers.


(David Pilato) #6

You need the EC2 plugin if you want to scale and add more instances.
EC2 plugin will help to discover other nodes using ec2 settings.

Yes, all the world will have a full access to your node.
But, with Network settings, you could restrict access to your client IP address.
Then you can add the jetty plugin to have a login/password minimal protection.

About cloudbees, i'm using ES embedded in a war and it's deployed in cloudbees.

HTH
David

Le 12 juin 2012 à 07:20, Dennis gearond@gmail.com a écrit :

This works using the EC2 plugin for ElasticSearch, right? Or is the machine always CAPABLE of responding to it's network connection once the port gets enabled? LIke my personal machine right now, if I enabled port 9300 and 9200 on it and all the firewalls in the modems/etc, the world could access my machine's ES instance?

BTW, looks like the whole idea can be done if so. My automation server/continuous integration server can start and stop the EC2 instance with the server on it, and so it won't run continuously. I'm on cloudBees to save money and use it's very helpful integrations. It just doesn't have ES.

On Monday, June 11, 2012 10:12:28 PM UTC-7, David Pilato wrote:
You will get a public address to connect on.
You have only to open some ports (9300 and if needed 9200).

HTH
David :wink:
Twitter : @dadoonet / @elasticsearchfr

Le 12 juin 2012 à 07:01, Dennis :

Had another brainstorm, probably known by the more experienced ones on this list.

Cloudbees is on EC2. If I start an EC2 instance of ElasticSearch, I will get a private IP address. Will I be able to connect to it on port:ESPort#/ ?

For now I'm using http transport in Java, but I'll write using the Java API soon. I guess I just need a unique server name on my ES instance?

On Monday, June 11, 2012 8:21:32 PM UTC-7, Dennis wrote:
A good, temporary substitute, since I'm using java HttpClient to the localhost to get around some problems would be accessing a remote instance via public IP.

I've looked and I must not be seeing it, if it's available.

I only need a single machine instance right now.

On Monday, June 11, 2012 7:45:24 PM UTC-7, Dennis wrote:
CloudBees is a nice little site. the preset up Jenkins and java environment is great for dev and small deploys.

However, their choice of popular applications does not include ElasticSearch. I have looked through all of the possibilties, and it still comes up short. ES is the easiest of all search engines to use, has the features I want out of the box, and is perfect as document/entity store.

Soooo, anyone heard of a way to deploy it on Cloudbees?

Shay, you interested in jumping on CloudBees ramp up to success? They should end up being a decent, mid market, major share holder for Java developers.


(Eric Jain) #7

On Jun 11, 10:39 pm, David Pilato da...@pilato.fr wrote:

Yes, all the world will have a full access to your node.

That's what prevented me from using a service like CloudBees or
Heroku. Restricting by IP address requires that you have a fixed set
of known IPs; also, IPs are shared among many applications, so it's
not really secure. You therefore have to secure elasticsearch with the
Jetty plugin and use the REST API, which means throwing out the code
you wrote using the Java API...


(David Pilato) #8

Agree !

AlsoI really think that we need to write a java Rest client for ES.

David :wink:
Twitter : @dadoonet / @elasticsearchfr

Le 12 juin 2012 à 19:57, Eric Jain eric.jain@gmail.com a écrit :

On Jun 11, 10:39 pm, David Pilato da...@pilato.fr wrote:

Yes, all the world will have a full access to your node.

That's what prevented me from using a service like CloudBees or
Heroku. Restricting by IP address requires that you have a fixed set
of known IPs; also, IPs are shared among many applications, so it's
not really secure. You therefore have to secure elasticsearch with the
Jetty plugin and use the REST API, which means throwing out the code
you wrote using the Java API...


(Dennis) #9

I can't believe that it's not possible to open up the 9300 port only on the
local network IP. I guess, though,that that would be open to all other EC2
users if they knew the name of your ES instances.

Definitely going to think about this once i get real data up.

Did anyone see the new Amazon EC2 prices/services? You can get a dedicated
Amazon expert for not a lot of money now. This security issue would be one
to task them about.

On Tuesday, June 12, 2012 11:02:22 AM UTC-7, David Pilato wrote:

Agree !

AlsoI really think that we need to write a java Rest client for ES.

David :wink:
Twitter : @dadoonet / @elasticsearchfr

Le 12 juin 2012 à 19:57, Eric Jain eric.jain@gmail.com a écrit :

On Jun 11, 10:39 pm, David Pilato da...@pilato.fr wrote:

Yes, all the world will have a full access to your node.

That's what prevented me from using a service like CloudBees or
Heroku. Restricting by IP address requires that you have a fixed set
of known IPs; also, IPs are shared among many applications, so it's
not really secure. You therefore have to secure elasticsearch with the
Jetty plugin and use the REST API, which means throwing out the code
you wrote using the Java API...


(Eric Jain) #10

On Fri, Jun 15, 2012 at 9:22 AM, Dennis gearond@gmail.com wrote:

I can't believe that it's not possible to open up the 9300 port only on the
local network IP. I guess, though,that that would be open to all other EC2
users if they knew the name of your ES instances.

Definitely going to think about this once i get real data up.

Did anyone see the new Amazon EC2 prices/services? You can get a dedicated
Amazon expert for not a lot of money now. This security issue would be one
to task them about.

This isn't an issue with EC2: You can set up a "security group" and
restrict port 9300 to machines in that group. But that isn't possible
if you are using CloudBees or Heroku. Heroku does have the option to
get a dedicated IP address which could be used to restrict access--but
that's an extra cost of $100 per month for each machine...


(ferhatsb) #11

Hi all,

Probably resurecting this post but check out my post
http://blog.searchbox.io/blog/2012/09/27/using-elasticsearch-with-searchbox-on-cloudbees/

Regards,

Ferhat.
www.searchbox.io

On Tuesday, June 12, 2012 5:45:24 AM UTC+3, Dennis wrote:

CloudBees is a nice little site. the preset up Jenkins and java
environment is great for dev and small deploys.

However, their choice of popular applications does not include
ElasticSearch. I have looked through all of the possibilties, and it still
comes up short. ES is the easiest of all search engines to use, has the
features I want out of the box, and is perfect as document/entity store.

Soooo, anyone heard of a way to deploy it on Cloudbees?

Shay, you interested in jumping on CloudBees ramp up to success? They
should end up being a decent, mid market, major share holder for Java
developers.

--


(system) #12